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Overview

Although Grand Junction is flat and quiet, with far more churches than nightclubs, the city is part of the Grand Valley, a rich outdoor area of massive mesas, gnarled sandstone formations, tall, natural arches, dry canyons, and scenic lakes. In almost every direction is an adventure: the Grand Mesa, to the south, is a flat-topped, 10,000-foot-tall mountain; the Bookcliffs, to the north, have the feel of an inverted Grand Canyon, 2,000 feet tall, red, yellow, and completely flat, stretching 100 miles into Utah; and even the Palisade orchards and vineyards, to the east, have a certain cherry-and-apricot-filled natural beauty. Few visitors come ...

Although Grand Junction is flat and quiet, with far more churches than nightclubs, the city is part of the Grand Valley, a rich outdoor area of massive mesas, gnarled sandstone formations, tall, natural arches, dry canyons, and scenic lakes. In almost every direction is an adventure: the Grand Mesa, to the south, is a flat-topped, 10,000-foot-tall mountain; the Bookcliffs, to the north, have the feel of an inverted Grand Canyon, 2,000 feet tall, red, yellow, and completely flat, stretching 100 miles into Utah; and even the Palisade orchards and vineyards, to the east, have a certain cherry-and-apricot-filled natural beauty. Few visitors come to this region for the nightlife or hotels, but the cycling, cross-country skiing, and accompanying mountaineering outfits are world-class. With a population of 40,000, Grand Junction is the largest town between Denver and Salt Lake City.

Steve Knopper
About the Expert

Steve Knopper is the Denver-based author of Moon Handbooks Colorado as well as a contributor to numerous Fodor's city guides.

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Steve Knopper for Triporati

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Facts at a Glance

Climate

  • Best Time to Visit:

    Spring, early fall, parts of summer when it's not boiling hot